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2016 Social Media Image Size Cheat Sheet

One of the reasons I read the Constant Contact blog is that they consistently share great stuff like this.

Source: 2016 Social Media Image Size Cheat Sheet | Constant Contact Blogs

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2015 Social Media Image Size Cheat Sheet

2015 Social Media Image Size Cheat Sheet (more info on www.goingsocialhouston.com)

I’m always trying to figure out what size/dimensions I need to save an image in for a Facebook post vs Twitter vs Google+. I recently came across this handy (updated) easy to read 2015 Social Media Image Size Cheat Sheet on the Constant Contact website which gives sizes for most of the everyday social media images you’ll need to post.

Since I try not to reshare images that I don’t actually own or for which I’ve been given permission to share… I’m linking to the article instead of posting the image here.

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NOTES:

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IFTTT recipes to help you share Instagram pics

IFTTT recipes to help you share Instagram pics (more info at www.goingsocialhouston.com)I recently started using my first IFTTT recipe, and I love it! For those of you who (like me) haven’t discovered IFTTT, it’s short for If This Then That. It lets you set up triggers on your social channels that prompt specific actions.

In my case, when I post an image onto Instagram, IFTTT subsequently reposts the image in Twitter as a native image, copying over the message. It’s awesome! That way I don’t have to post it twice myself and Twitter shows real photos in my posts instead of Instagram links.

I got the “recipe” link from this Mashable article, “5 IFTTT recipes to share Instagram pics like a boss.” The article includes other recipes like automating your Instagram Photos being added to a specific Facebook album and sending tagged photos to Tumblr.

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NOTES

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Why You Should Avoid Hotlinking

Have you started using the new WordPress bookmarklet? It’s the “button” you add to your browser that basically turns the current webpage into a blog post. One of the new features is that it “suggests” embedding an image from that webpage … an image that doesn’t belong to you (in most cases).

Free Technology for Teachers defines hotlinking as “inserting a picture into a blog post through a URL rather than uploading the image file itself to your blog.” This is fine, if you own the picture. However, if you are bascially “stealing” someone else’s image, that’s when it becomes a problem.

So, don’t hotlink your images!

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Source: What is Hotlinking? – Why You and Your Students Should Avoid It | Free Technology for Teachers

Image source: geralt / Pixabay

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Stock Photos: Gourmet Burgers

More photos taken in my personal project: to become a better photographer. I’m releasing these into public domain.

Click on the image to view the complete size. You are allowed to “borrow” these images to use under the following guidelines:

Gourmet burgers Gourmet burgers Gourmet burgers

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Stock Photos: Bay Area Park

Click on the image to view the complete size. You are allowed to “borrow” these images to use under the following guidelines:

Bay Area Park; Clear Lake, Texas Bay Area Park; Clear Lake, Texas  Bay Area Park; Clear Lake, Texas  Bay Area Park; Clear Lake, Texas  Bay Area Park; Clear Lake, Texas Bay Area Park; Clear Lake, Texas Bay Area Park; Clear Lake, Texas Bay Area Park; Clear Lake, Texas Bay Area Park; Clear Lake, Texas

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Can I Use that Picture? (infographic)

I found this infographic via Lifehacker, shared by Visual.ly:

Knowing the copyright laws for using images can be a bit tricky. Follow this series of questions to know if you can use a picture for your purposes or not.
TIP: click on the image to see the readable version.

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SOURCES:
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Stock Photos: House under construction

Click on the image to view the complete size. You are allowed to “borrow” these images to use under the following guidelines:


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Stock Photos: Spring Flowers

Click on the image to view the complete size. You are allowed to “borrow” these images to use under the following guidelines:




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Stock photos: George R. Brown Convention Center

Instructions

Click on the image to view the complete size. You are allowed to “borrow” these images to use under the following guidelines: